Mistakes to Avoid When Transferring a Property Tax Base

Irrevocable Trust Loans

California Loans to Trusts

The Right Advice & The Right Trust Loan Lender 

Much to the relief of many Californians who are in the process of inheriting a home from a parent, California Proposition 19 allows you keep a parents low property base on the inherited home in many cases. However, quite often, new homeowners and beneficiaries trigger a property tax hike by accident, and end up facing thousands upon thousands of dollars in property taxes, all due to property tax reassessment. Thankfully that can all be avoided with the right advice and a loan to an irrevocable trust when one is needed. Working with Trust & Estate Attorney’s and Property Tax Consultants, we have helped hundreds of clients take advantage of their Prop 19 & Prop 58 benefit with our loans to Irrevocable Trusts. In fact we have helped clients save over 21 million dollars with our loans.

Due to rapidly increasing property values and California Proposition 13 ( which helps keep property taxes low in California ), we save our average client over $6,500 in property taxes each year by avoiding reassessment on an inherited home. Best of all, the process is easy and every beneficiary wins because you are able to avoid the costly real estate fees involved with selling a home.

The California Parent-to-Child Exclusion

As far as parent to child transfers are concerned, when one beneficiary who is inheriting a home decides to buyout property shares inherited by co-beneficiaries (siblings) – to have complete ownership of the property, it’s easy to misstep and mistakenly trigger property tax reassessment. A parent to child property tax transfer in is line with the effort to  avoid property tax reassessment under Proposition 19’s parent-child exclusion. Therefore a loan to an irrevocable trust working in conjunction with Proposition 19 allows us to transfer property between siblings – buying out property from siblings. In many situations a loan to an irrevocable trust is needed because there is not sufficient cash assets in the trust to make an equal distribution to all child beneficiaries. That is where we come in.

Choosing the Right Trust Lender to Keep a Parent Low Property Tax  Base

Commercial Loan Corporation is one of just a handful of California lenders that will lend money directly to an irrevocable trust with no personal guarantee. We are also the only Trust & Estate Lender in California who works with hundreds of Trust & Estate Attorneys and provides them with California State Bar authorized Continuing Legal Education on the topic of Proposition 19 and lending to an irrevocable trust. If you are a client is in need of a loan to an irrevocable trust, please call us at 877-464-1066. We will answer all of your questions and provide you with a free trust loan benefit analysis.

Parent to Child Property Tax Transfer in California

Parent to Child Property Tax Transfers in California

Parent to Child Property Tax Transfers in California

Perhaps the greatest benefit of California Proposition 58 and Proposition 19 is the ability those propositions grant to a parent allowing them to transfer their low property tax base to a child. On average avoiding property tax reassessment saves a child inheriting a home over $6,500 a year. In some situations that property tax savings means the difference between a child being able to afford keeping an inherited home or having to sell it.

Depending on the date of death of the parent who is transferring real estate to a child, the child may be able to take advantage of the Proposition 58 benefit or be forced to use the new Proposition 19 property tax transfer benefit. California Proposition 19 went into effect on February 16, 2021. The California Board of Equalization has created a chart (located here) to help you understand the difference between the Prop 58 and the Prop 19 parent to child transfer benefits. The two primary differences boil down to the ability to transfer a home that will not be used as a primary residence and the amount of property value that you are able to exclude from reassessment. Proposition 19 only allows a child to avoid property tax reassessment on a home that will be used as their primary residence, where Proposition 58 does not have that restriction. Additionally, Proposition 19 allows you to exclude the current taxable value plus $1,000,000; where Proposition 58 has no value limitations for a principal residence.

Often times when a trust is involved, a parent will leave a family home to multiple child beneficiaries. When that is the case and one of the children wishes to keep the family home and take advantage of their Proposition 58 or Proposition 19 property tax transfer benefit to avoid property tax reassessment, the trust may need to borrow money against the home so that an equal distribution on trust assets can be made. In many cases the California Board of Equalization will require an equal distribution of the trust assets be made in order to qualify for an exclusion from property tax reassessment. If there are not sufficient cash assets held in the trust, the trust will need to borrow the funds to make the equal distribution. Commercial Loan Corporation is one of the few lenders in California that will make a loan to an irrevocable trust.

We specialize in assisting beneficiaries and trust administrators when a loan to an irrevocable trust is required. If you would like to learn more about how a loan to a trust can help you avoid property tax reassessment on an inherited home, please call us at 877-464-1066.

Property Taxes In California

How to Transfer a Parents Property Tax Base

How To Keep A Parents Low Property Tax Base On An Inherited Home

What is California  Proposition 13?

In the 1970s property tax hikes were completely out of control. Working class and middle class families were losing their homes because they could no longer afford to make their mortgage payments with the rapidly increasing property taxes factored in. California Proposition 13 changed all of that!

California Proposition 13, officially named the People’s Initiative to Limit Property Taxation, was amended the Constitution of California in 1978. The initiative was approved by California voters on June 6, 1978.  California Prop 13 states that the maximum amount of any ad valorem tax on real property shall not exceed one percent (1%) of the full cash value of such property. The one percent (1%) tax to be collected by the counties and apportioned according to law to the districts within the counties.

Additionally and perhaps most importantly, Proposition 13 decreased property taxes by assessing values at their 1976 value and restricted annual increases of assessed value to an inflation factor, not to exceed 2% per year. It also prohibits the reassessment of a new base year value except in cases of change in ownership or completion of new construction.

By making these changes to the California Constitution, Prop 13 stabilized property taxes for home owners. People were able to predict if home ownership was going to be affordable for them now and in the future. In situations of rapidly increasing property values, like we have experience in California over the last 50 years, people were no longer in jeopardy of losing their homes due to the inability to afford the increase in their property taxes.

What is California Proposition 58 – Parent to Child Property Tax Transfer?

As time passed a new issue made itself evident. When parents passed on the family home to children a change of ownership would occur and the child who inherited the home would have the property reassessed. In many situations, this property tax reassessment would make the home unaffordable and the child would have no option but to sell the family home.

On November 6, 1986,  California’s Proposition 58 granted Californians the ability to avoid property value reassessment on inherited real estate. With certain limitations, California Proposition 58 allowed for the exclusion for reassessment of property taxes on transfers between parents and children. Proposition 58 allows the new property owner to avoid property tax increases when acquiring property from their parents. The new owner’s taxes are instead calculated on the established Proposition 13 factored base year value, instead of the current market value when the property is acquired.

What is California Proposition 19?

On November 3, 2020, California voters approved Proposition 19. Prop 19, also known as the Home Protection for Seniors, Severely Disabled, Families and Victims of Wildfire or Natural Disasters Act made sweeping changes to a property owner’s ability to transfer their Proposition 13 Assessed Value and also replaced California Prop 58. The measure allows homeowners to transfers their assessed value in some situation and added new transfer provisions for victims of disasters and individuals severely handicapped. Prop 19 changed Prop 58 and limited the parent to child property tax transfer and exclusion for property tax reassessment to $1,000,000 in assessed value and to owner occupied properties. In order to receive your Prop 19 parent to child transfer benefit, the California Board of Equalization and the County Assessors Office has requirements on how the transfer is made.

Commercial Loan Corporation works with your Estate Attorney or California Property Tax Profession to help you qualify for your Prop 19 Parent to Child Transfer Benefit. We provide loans to Irrevocable Trusts and Probate; allowing for an equalized distribution to be made to all involved child beneficiaries without having a personal guarantee from the acquiring beneficiary.

Are you curious if you are eligible for the California Prop 19 Parent to Child Transfer Benefit or would like to learn more about it? We have helped hundreds of clients receive their benefit and on average save them over $6,500 per year in property taxes. Call us at 877-464-1066; we will answer all of your questions and let you know how much you may be able to save in property taxes on an inherited home.

California Proposition 19

California Proposition 19

California Proposition 19

The President of Commercial Loan Corporation, Mr. Kerry Smith was recently published in the Orange County Register regarding California Proposition 19 and the impact made on California residents. In the article, Mr. Smith compares the new Prop 19 property tax transfer benefits to the previous benefits granted to Californian’s by California Prop 58.

Mr. Smith states “It is important to understand how Proposition 58 helps the average Californian. The majority of transfers from parent to child happen after both parents have passed. The date of passing of the last (surviving) parent will be used as the date of transfer to the beneficiaries (children). Our average client takes 17 months to settle the estate after the death of the surviving parent. During this time, the children are responsible for continuing to pay the property taxes on their parent’s home and any other property. Under Proposition 58, passed overwhelmingly by voters in 1986, a home and up to $1 million of assessed value of other property are excluded from reassessment when transferred between parents and children. This keeps the property tax bill the same.”

You may view the entire article on the Orange County Register website located here. If you or a family member are interested in transferring a parents low property tax base on an inherited home and have questions or require a loan to a trust to equalize a trust distribution, please call us at 877-464-1066.

Irrevocable Trust Loans

Lending to an Irrevocable Trust

Lending to an Irrevocable Trust

Commercial Loan Corporation is one of only a few California lenders that will lend directly to an irrevocable trust. So what is an irrevocable trust?

An irrevocable trust is a type of trust where its terms cannot be modified, amended or terminated under most conditions. Often times, an irrevocable trust will begin as a living trust and once the grantor passes, will turn into an irrevocable trust. An irrevocable trust designates a trustee and beneficiary(s). The trustee is the person who manages the trust and may also be one of the beneficiaries. An irrevocable trust is commonly used to pass assets to heirs while avoiding probate. When you transfer your assets into an irrevocable trust, you relinquish control of those assets. The trust becomes the owner of the assets at that point.

The reason why most lenders will not lend directly to an irrevocable trust is because the trust is the owner of the assets, as opposed to an individual. This become important when a child is inheriting a home from a parent and would like to use Prop 58, or Prop 19 to keep a parents low property tax base. The California Board of Equalization requires and equal distribution of assets be made when multiple beneficiaries are involved unless specific conditions are met. If there are not sufficient cash assets in the trust to make an equal distribution, then a loan against real estate in the trust will be needed to qualify for the parent to child transfer to avoid property tax reassessment.

That is where Commercial Loan Corporation comes into play. We specialize in lending to trusts and estates; specifically irrevocable trusts.  Our trust loans, allow one child to keep an inherited home with the parents low Prop 13 tax base in tact, while the other child beneficiaries receive an equal portion of cash. Everybody wins! By avoiding expensive realtor fees, each beneficiary on average receives and additional $15,000 in inheritance and the child keeping the family home saves on average $6,200 per year in property taxes.

If you, a family member or a client may be able to benefit from a trust loan, we are here to assist you and answer any questions you might have.  Please call us at 877-464-1066.

California Proposition 19

California Proposition 19

California Proposition 19

On November 3, 2020, California voters approved Proposition 19, the Home Protection for Seniors, Severely Disabled, Families and Victims of Wildfire or Natural Disasters Act. Proposition 19 is a California constitutional amendment that limits people who inherit family properties from keeping the low property tax base unless they use the home as their primary residence.

This new proposition will make important changes to existing statewide property tax saving programs for Californians. California Proposition 19 replaces California Proposition 58(1986) and Proposition 193(1996) by limiting parent-and-child transfer and grandparent-to-grandchild transfer exclusions. These Prop 19 changes are likely to go into effect on 2/16/2021. As of right now, the California Board of Equalization is still trying to work out some of the formalities of the new legislation. You can view the Board of Equalization current interpretation of California Proposition 19 here.

Here are the impacts made to Proposition 58 by Proposition 19 as expressed on the California BOE website:
California Proposition 19 changes to Proposition 58California Proposition 19 changes to Proposition 58

The two most significant changes made to Proposition 58 by California Proposition 19 are the restriction to occupancy and the new $1,000,000 benefit limit on a primary home. Even once these changes to Prop 58 are in place, there are still significant benefits available to California residents who inherit a home from a parent. Providing you intend to occupy the home as your primary residence so can still save as much as $10,000 annually in property tax savings.

If you, a family member or client has questions on California Proposition 19, or would like a free benefit analysis on how much you may be able to save by taking advantage of a parent to child property tax transfer, please call us at 877-464-1066.

 

 

Join Us at the 2020 USC Gould Trust & Estate Conference

USC Gould Trust and Estate Conference

USC Gould Trust and Estate Conference

Please join us this November 13th for the Virtual 46th Annual USC Gould Trust and Estate Conference. We are sponsoring the event again this year and will be available to answer any questions you have on Lending to an Irrevocable Trust or Probate Estate. Our loans assist clients in qualifying for the California Prop 58 Parent to Child Exclusion from Property Tax Reassessment on an inherited home.

Tanis Alonso, one of our Trust & Estate Loan Senior Account Executives will be available for Zoom meetings during the Conference or available by phone at (877) 464-1066 to assist you and provide you with more information on our specialized lending programs. Commercial Loan Corporations is one of the only lenders in California who will lend to an Irrevocable Trusts, allowing our clients to meet the California Board of Equalization requirements to qualify for their Exclusion from Reassessment.

If you are interested in attending this years USC Gould Trust and Estate Conference, please visit their website here for more details: Trust & Estate Conference – Los Angeles

This years USC Gould Trust & Estate Conference Features Information on the following

Keynote Presentation: Bending the Arc of History with Terrence Franklin
Practical Topics: Annual Updates, Trustee and Beneficiary Harmony, Anti-SLAPP, Divorce, Stretching Retirement Savings, and Sub-Trust Allocations
CE Credit: MCLE, CPE, CFP, PFB, and CTFA (Pending)

8:30 AM – 8:35 AM (PST)
Welcome and Introductions
8:35 AM – 10:05 AM (PST)
Annual Update: Recent Developments in Probate and Trust and their Practical Applications
10:05 AM – 10:20 AM (PST)
Break Sponsored by Professional Fiduciary Association of California
10:20 AM – 11:20 AM (PST)
Love in the Time of COVID-19: Trustee and Beneficiary Harmony in Years Like 2020
11:30 AM – 12:30 PM (PST)
No-Contest Clauses and the Anti-SLAPP Statute: Traps for the Unwary
12:40 PM – 1:20 PM (PST)
Keynote Presentation Sponsored by Signature Resolution: Bending the Arc of History Towards Justice in the Probate Court
1:20 PM – 1:40 PM (PST)
Break Sponsored by Jack Barcal, Esq.
1:40 PM – 2:40 PM (PST)
Tales from the Dark Side: HELP, My Client Is Getting Divorced (or Married, or Remarried). What Do I Do?
2:50 PM – 3:50 PM (PST)
How to Stretch Retirement Savings with a CRUT
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (PST)
Better Late Than Never? The Looming Implications of Late Allocations to Sub-Trusts

For more information on our loans to irrevocable trusts and probate estates, please call us at 877-464-1066. We can provide you or your client with a free cost benefit analysis and let them know exactly how much property saving can be attained by taking advantage of a parent to child property transfer and exclusion from property tax reassessment.

The California Parent to Child Exclusion From Property Tax Reassessment

Parent Child Exclusion From Property Tax Reassessment

Parent Child Exclusion From Property Tax Reassessment

Commercial Loan Corporation specializes in helping clients qualify for California Proposition 58’s Parent to Child Exclusion from Property Tax Reassessment with our Trust and Estate loans. You may be wondering what the parent to child exclusion from property tax reassessment is. When a parent passes and leaves a child real estate in California, Prop 58 grants the ability for a child to also inherit the parents low property tax base on the property if certain conditions are met and the appropriate documents are submitted correctly to the county tax assessors office.

How does Commercial Loan Corporation help in that situation?

Often times when there are multiple children involved and one of those children want’s to inherit the property and keep the parents low property taxes, the county assessors office will require an equal distribution of assets be made to all children. Unfortunately most Trust & Estates do not have sufficient cash assets for an equal distribution to be made and that may result in the inherited home being reassessed. Commercial Loan Corporation can assist clients in that situation. Unlike most California lenders, we specialize in assisting customers with the California Proposition 58 parent to child exclusion from property tax reassessment. In fact, we are one of the only California lenders that will lend directly to an Irrevocable Trust with no personal guarantee from the acquiring beneficiary which is often a Board of Equalization requirement when the property is held in an irrevocable trust and multiple beneficiaries are involved.

If you, a family member or a client of yours is inheriting property and are interested in transferring a parents low property tax base please give us a call at 877-464-1066. We can answer any questions you may have and provide you with a free analysis of how much your might be able to save by taking advantage of the California Proposition 58 Parent to Child Exclusion From Property tax Reassessment.

Irrevocable Trust Loan

Irrevocable Trust Loans

Irrevocable Trust Loans

Recently Tanis Alonso, one our Trust & Estate Loan Account Executives was interviewed by the staff at PropertyTaxTransferTrusts.com/  here are some of the highlights of that interview and the full interview can be found here: Trust Loan Interview

We sat in with noted Proposition 58, trust loan expert – Tanis Alonso, at Commercial Loan Corporation in Southern California. Tanis has a uniquely profound, global understanding of the entire trust loan process; and applies a very human, not simply financial, viewpoint to the process ~ as does the entire team at the cloanc.com organization; with a strong, genuine focus on “helping people” not simply implementing financial transactions…

Property Tax Transfer: Thank you so much for agreeing to chat with us about Proposition 58 and trust loans today…

Tanis Alonso: Of course. It’s my pleasure.

Property Tax Transfer: Great. Tanis, can we take a close look at how the basic trust loan process works in California, from your perspective, as a lender – and from the point of view of your average everyday beneficiary, many who need to keep parents property taxes…  Some who want to sell a property they are inheriting from their parents – and of course the other beneficiaries to a trust or estate that are determined to keep that home, and fight that sale. But first, who is your typical caller? Who in the estate or trust scenario tends to reach out to you first?

Tanis Alonso: Basically, whomever is trying to not sell the inherited property – is generally the initial caller to my office. It might be the trustee, frequently at odds with certain beneficiaries… Or very often it’s a family member, one of the beneficiary’s to the trust that doesn’t want to sell that home.

Property Tax Transfer: Got it. So, what does an average Proposition 58 property transfer and trust loan scenario in California look like, contributing to peace of mind for property owners? There must be similar scenarios, that reflect average  trust or estate outcomes all across the state.

Tanis: Absolutely. One of the most common scenarios we see, here at Commercial Loan Corp., are elderly parents, for example… who, sadly, pass away, leaving loved ones behind. So, let’s say there is an estate, or perhaps a trust, and there are three beneficiaries involved… And property is the only asset… Let’s say there are no cash accounts. And this is not uncommon these days.

Property Tax Transfer: Yes, we hear that it’s quite common to see a trust inheritance, or probate estate, where there is very little cash left at the end of the road…

Tanis: Exactly. Parents who pass away in their nineties let’s say, who basically have spent most of their cash assets that were in savings, or in stocks and bonds, and by the time they get into their mid or late nineties, those assets are mostly gone, cashed out or spent –

Property Tax Transfer: OK. So there isn’t much money left in many inheritances… So what do beneficiaries do? When do these conflicts we hear so much about begin, when a house is being inherited by several beneficiaries… some who wish to sell, and some who prefer to keep the property, and to keep parents property taxes?

Tanis: Well, here is a typical middle class inherited real estate scenario – let’s say, for example, there are three beneficiaries and no other assets being inherited except an older home. One beneficiary wants to keep the house, to keep parents property taxes; while the other two siblings prefer to get cash from an immediate house sale, probably through a nearby realtor. But – instead of selling to a buyer, here is where Proposition 58 and a trust loan comes into play, providing liquidity and compliance with the Proposition 58 tax system – furnishing the two siblings who prefer to sell, with enough cash liquidity as if they had sold their shares in the inherited property to a buyer…

Property Tax Transfer: So why not sell? Why the trust loan?

Tanis: Because with a loan to a trust there is the upside of less expense. Frequently, we’re talking about ten times less of an expense than would normally be involved in a house sale. Again, a process compensating beneficiaries through a trust loan, instead of a house sale or coming up with the cash yourself… versus a formal house sale through a realtor that would cost approximately ten times the amount to process the entire scenario, a house sale, with realtor commission and fees, taxes, ancillary costs, etc…

Property Tax Transfer: Paying off the beneficiaries who wanted the cash from a house sale in the first place, right?

Tanis (Commercial Loan Corporation): Exactly. And so the rest of the trust loan goes to pay for 100% of parents Proposition 13 tax base – and the Proposition 58 tax system makes it possible to transfer the property to the beneficiary or beneficiaries that did not want to sell – to keep parents property taxes at the low Proposition 13 tax rate – or involving Proposition 193 if it is real property,  not left by the parents, but by grandparents.

Property Tax Transfer: You say ten times less on expenses versus paying for it yourself?

Tanis Alonso: Absolutely. It costs the families we help far less to get a trust loan from us, believe it or not, then it does if they were to dig into their own savings to complete the Proposition 58 property transfer process.

Property Tax Transfer: How does that translate in terms of real numbers?

Tanis Alonso:  Let’s say a property value is currently one million dollars and the current tax base is $1,200. If they were to get reassessed at current value that would be around $11,000 annually.  By someone keeping the property and obtaining a trust loan to properly buy out their siblings that allows the beneficiary that is keeping the property to keep parents property taxes, to retain 100% of the Proposition 13 tax base that was paid by their parents and keep that low property tax base of $1,200. This of course creates much greater affordability than if they were to improperly buy out their siblings and have that property reassessed. The loan to trust goes hand in hand with the Proposition 58 property tax transfer system, creating enough liquidity to equalize distributions, not sell, and allow a beneficiary to keep their parents property with their low property tax base.

Property Tax Transfer: It sounds counter intuitive, doesn’t it.

Tanis Alonso: I know, it does sound counter intuitive – yet it’s true. All you have to do is run the numbers yourself, and you’ll see what I’m talking about. It’s a better way to be able to keep an inherited house in the family, and to keep parents property taxes, when there is a dispute going on that pits the beneficiary who wants to keep a house against the beneficiaries that want to sell that home. A home that a family has so many memories associated with; with such strong emotional attachments to. There are so many wonderful family memories that are attached to each home. And every home is unique and different in that sense, just as every family member is different and unique.

Property Tax Transfer: You mean emotional memories you can’t replace with cash, in fact you can’t buy for any amount of money.

Tanis Alonso: That’s right. Anyway, this process allows families to keep that home in the family. And that’s the most important point!

Property Tax Transfer: It is the crucial point.

Tanis Alonso: Absolutely. And as a person on the front lines for this firm, neither I or Commercial Loan Corp. view each trust loan scenario as simply a “financial transaction”. Nor do we see the home they’ve lived in for decades as just a “piece of real property”. To us, this a “piece of family history” in the making. And the process a family decision, not a “transaction”. We see our clients as real families that we’re helping, financially and emotionally, not just as clients signing a contract for a trust loan. For us it’s much more than that.

Property Tax Transfer: It’s very obvious that you really enjoy helping people… getting them money when they really need it – and saving them on the cost side in the bargain, with trust loans.

Tanis Alonso: Correct. We see them as real people that we’re able to help in a time of need. For us it’s so much more than cash and property – we don’t view it that way. We’re talking about family history here. Not just “another deal”.

Property Tax Transfer:  Tanis, let me ask you…  Beneficiaries that call your company, desperate to keep parents property taxes;  for any solution to their property transfer / Proposition 58 issue – is it a safe bet to assume that 99% of the time there are elements that come up again and again?

Tanis: Well, that’s true, to a point. With beneficiaries that call us, with a trust or estate situation, there is always real property being inherited, going to one or several beneficiaries… and little, if any, cash – and each family always has different dynamics. There are always differences, as regards the people and details involved. But, the one constant you can be sure of is that there is always someone who wants to sell… and always someone who wants to keep the property they are inheriting… dead set against selling.

Property Tax Transfer: And at the end of the tunnel, is it safe to assume that with your company it’s generally a win-win equation, for everyone involved. Everyone involved, more or less, get what they want, right?

Tanis Alonso (Commercial Loan Corporation): That’s right.  99% of the time. The beneficiary, or beneficiaries, that want cash from the sale of the property that they’re inheriting, get the cash they were looking for, from the trust loan…

Property Tax Transfer: And the beneficiary or beneficiaries that want to keep the house, get to keep that house, and keep parents property taxes…

Tanis: Yes! And let me say that, typically, this is a really, really big win for them – as the siblings that wanted to sell are usually very vocal, and very aggressive about their desire to do so! That beneficiary that wants to keep that property, that is also able to get the other siblings a large amount of cash for their shares in the inherited real estate – while still being able to keep the home they’re so attached to, and keep parents property taxes; keeping parents property tax rate.  This would be practically impossible, were it not for our trust loan. And there’s your win-win equation!

Property Tax Transfer: And what about the cost factor? Costs involved in the equation… How does everyone benefit on that level, getting cash to the beneficiaries that wanted cash from a house sale? Versus coming up with property buyout cash themselves…

Tanis Alonso (Commercial Loan Corporation): OK, so cost involved, selling versus keeping inherited property. I’ll try to keep the equation simple. Costs associated with this property funding process through a trust loan, paying for everything, including beneficiary property shares buyout, taxes, etc. is, on average, 3.5% – So by someone keeping the family property everyone will receive more money than if they were to sell the property at approximately 6.5% in costs. The average trust receives $45,716 more to distribute than if they were to sell the property to some random buyer.  Each beneficiary on average is receiving $16,652 more by someone keeping the property, instead of selling it. And our average annual tax savings is $6,043. We have already saved a combined amount just shy of 1 million dollars for our clients on property taxes. That is a significant benefit for all beneficiaries when someone keeps the property instead of selling it!

PropertyTax Transfer: So you’re saying those savings would have been completely lost, per beneficiary, if they had sold out to a regular buyer…

Tanis Alonso (Commercial Loan Corporation): That’s right. For example, say it’s you and your sister.  A major conflict. You want to keep the house you’re all inheriting from your parents, plus keep parents property taxes. Why should I let my sister sell? The solution there is because you are going to get more cash in your hands than if you were to sell the property! That’s the bottom line. A trust loan transaction takes 7-10 business days whereas selling will take a few months. Everyone receives more money, more rapidly, then if they were to sell the property on the open market. Everyone benefits from this… it’s win-win all the way around.

PropertyTaxTransfer: So you let your sister sell, so everyone wins – is what you’re saying.

Tanis: Of course! Let her sell, let her get her way – and you end up getting your way… you get what you wanted, to keep your house with everyone paid off and happy. No more conflict. On a $500,000 property – do you want to spend 6.5% to sell that property, with a realtor, or 3.5% through our trust loan, in keeping with the Proposition 58 tax system? Which number would you want to give away, 6.5% or 3.5%?

Property Tax Transfer: Naturally. So the long range picture looks like increases in taxes as well, so that’s not as affordable either.

Tanis: Absolutely right. In certain cases a property tax reassessment can add an extra $700 to $1000 per month to your property taxes. That’s an extra $1,000 per month – not per year! Month after month. That is affordability vs not affordability to many.

Property Tax Transfer: Going through the Proposition 58 tax system, with the trust loan paying everyone off…  What would property taxes look like going down that road?

Tanis: OK so the question is, “why do I need a trust loan to buy out beneficiaries who want to sell our inherited house?”  The answer is you can still keep the house you’re inheriting, and not spend any of your own money in the process.  The importance of the trust loan is that you can buy out your siblings and still keep parents property taxes. You keep 100% of the low Proposition 13 property tax base that was originally paid by your parents.  If you were to use your own money to buy out your siblings, the State Board of Equalization would see that as a sibling buying out a sibling – and that would definitely trigger a property tax reassessment. Naturally, the result of that would be higher taxes.  So you need the trust loan to buy out your siblings in order to take advantage of Proposition 58, and keep the low property tax base.

Property Tax Transfer: Most people don’t have that kind of cash on hand nor do they want to use all of their cash for this just to buy out beneficiaries in an estate setting. Especially if the numbers go higher…

Tanis Alonso (Commercial Loan Corporation):  Beneficiaries who want to keep their inherited property still put a lot more money in their pocket, still save a lot more,  by not using their own funds…  by buying out beneficiaries that want to sell by going the trust loan route.  Staying within the discounted Proposition 13 tax base, being able to keep parents property taxes … taking advantage of the  Proposition 58 property tax system, or tax shelter.  Using this tax shelter  that we looked at before, if you recall – would be around $1,200 per year on a million dollar property.  Saving thousands of dollars annually on property taxes by taking advantage of Proposition 58; keeping their parents low property tax base.

Property Tax Transfer: Yes, the difference in the numbers are stunning.

Tanis Alonso (Commercial Loan Corporation):  Yes it is.  So if you use your own money to buy out your siblings you will trigger a reassessment… if that was reassessed normally, without doing the property transfer and beneficiary payoff with our trust loan – you’d be looking at an $11,000 tax hit per year on the same million dollar property!  If reassessed at the current, present day, base rate – that tax hit goes up 10 times. A significant difference in cash back in your pocket after it’s all done and said. Trust loans are a huge benefit for all of these families and that’s how we’re able to really help people in a significant way.

Property Tax Transfer: The amount of money saved really is remarkable.  And I can see that you genuinely enjoy helping your clients save a great deal of money with these trust loans. Making great use of the low Proposition 13 base rate, and the Proposition 58 property transfer tax shelter… The formula works!

Tanis Alonso: Absolutely. And helping people in this way is what it’s all about! That entire viewpoint is the basis for this whole company, from the top down – starting with the CEO, who is a truly terrific guy, who genuinely loves helping people, with money, memories, and time. And you can’t replace memories and time!

Property Tax Transfer:  You can’t replace memories and time… Very well put!  That is a concept to remember.

Tanis Alonso: It is so important to remember, when you truly care about what happens to the people you’re helping.

Property Tax Transfer: Very true.  Your clients are lucky to have you folks working for them.  Thanks so much for speaking with us today.

Tanis Alonso: Thank you.  It was a great pleasure chatting with you.

If you have questions about a loan for an Irrevocable Trust, or about California Proposition 58, please call Tanis at 877-464-1066.